Jo and I ran the Las Vegas Rock & Roll half marathon together. This was my first half marathon and Jo’s fourth now. Jo decided to pass the torch of running as Elvis to Rachel this year. We met with our friends Lori, Rachel, Warren, Mike, Lisa, Drew, Maika, and Zach as well. This is turning into a yearly event which is just a blast. It’s fun to go to Vegas and have something else to do besides gambling the whole time. We can’t wait until next year, in fact I think we’ll be running the Rock & Roll half marathon in Dallas in March.

I also thought I’d post the route we ran since I tracked the run in RunKeeper.

Jo ran in the Las Vegas Rock & Roll half marathon. She and Lori ran dressed as Elvis along with 200 other running Elvi. Mike also ran while Drew, Maika, Lisa, and I provided moral support and cheered them on. Lori picked up the nick name “spice cake” from some spectators. Jo picked up the nick name “lion pass” and Maika is now also known as “hot sauce”. If these require explanation just ask.

I guess next year I’ll be running with them. In fact I think Jo and I will be running in the Big Sur marathon in a few months, probably not the full marathon though.






It’s funny how the odds work out isn’t it? I borrowed this from Wikipedia for the game of roulette which Jo and I played exclusively while we were in Vegas.

The house average or house edge is the amount the player loses relative to any bet made, on average. If a player bets on a single number in the American game there is a probability of 1/38 that the player wins 35 times the bet, and a 37/38 chance that the player loses their bet. The expected value is: -1*37/38 + 35*1/38 = -0.0526 (5.26% house edge)

The house edge should not be confused with the hold. The hold is the total amount of cash the table changes for chips, minus the chips taken away from the table. In other words, the actual “win” amount for the casino. The Casino Control Commission in Atlantic City releases a monthly report showing the win/hold amounts for each casino. The average win/hold for double zero wheels is between 21-30%, significantly more than 5.26% of all players’ money because players are making repeated bets after winning and losing portions of their total money. This is known in the casino gaming industry as “churning”.

So Jo and I took $1,000 to gamble with in Vegas and we came home with about $700. So Vegas got their 30% from us on this trip. Not a bad business, right?

Now the real question is what are the odds of finding really good Sushi in the middle of the desert? This picture was taken at a Sushi restaurant in Harrah’s, … hands down some of the best sashimi I have ever had.